Written by Registered Biokineticist, Wendy van Wyk

Desk workers have started to suffer the aches that come from having a poor workspace setup. Incorrect setups have become a literal pain in the neck (and shoulders, and back, and everywhere!). Having poor or a lack of ergonomics can lead to repetitive stress, which causes huge workplace risk for many office workers.

An ergonomic workstation can reduce the risk of discomfort or pain that these stressors cause to our bodies. Designing a workspace that promotes good posture encourages efficiency which will lead to improved productivity.

Correct desk ergonomics will not only help you sit comfortably at a computer, but also improve your general health.

  1. Minimized Back and Neck Pain

Many desk workers sit at their desks with improper posture. In turn, this can cause pain, especially in the back and neck. To minimize this risk, the CDC found that sit/stand desks can reduce back and neck pain. By reducing sitting time by 66 minutes a day, 54% of participants experienced reduced back and neck pain.

  1. Better Heart Health

Prolonged periods of sitting can be harmful to the heart. By incorporating ergonomic tools that encourage movement, you can sit and stand as you please and move more in general. This will keep you healthier inside and out.

  1. Improved Mood and Energy Levels

Employees who have low energy are less likely to be productive. Too much sedentary time has been linked to heightened risks of anxiety and depression.

Studies have found that employees who move routinely were less stressed and fatigued. The same participants also reported that they have more energy throughout the work day. Healthier employees are happier and more productive.

Are you ready to introduce a healthier workplace? Contact us today to get started towards a healthier working environment!

Yours in Ergonomics

Wendy

References

Pronk NP, Katz AS, Lowry M, Payfer JR. Reducing Occupational Sitting Time and Improving Worker Health: The Take-a-Stand Project, 2011. Prev Chronic Dis 2012; 9:110323

https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2016/16_0263.htm

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